Environmental pollution book

 

    Complex environmental problems are often reduced to an inappropriate level of simplicity. While this book does not seek to present a comprehensive scientific. download Environmental Pollution and Control - 4th Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBN , Links to databases for air and water quality, solid waste management, and environmental law and policy. Also helpful for topics such as.

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    Environmental Pollution Book

    The Book Environmental Pollution, Is The Outcome Of Intensive Efforts Made By The Author For More Than Seven Years In Collection Of Materials, Their. 5 Environmental Pollution After reading this chapter, you will be conversant with: Definition, Causes, Effects and Control Measures of: Air pollution Water. This sets us up to look for the social story carried by concepts like 'pollution. that comes to environmental health science and policy from the shipping industry .

    Deterioration of environmental health caused by rapid industrialization, urbanization and increasing population pressure, is a major concern for developing countries, including India. In comparison to conventional remediation approaches, modern methods are more superior and effective in removing a large amount of organic and inorganic pollutants from contaminated sources Ren and Umble, Most of environmental pollutants such as phenolics, non-phenolics, endocrine disrupting chemicals EDCs and heavy metals HMs are highly toxic in nature. Governments around the globe are strictly advocating for the mitigation of environmental pollution. This book is timely and focusses on the necessity to learn about the existing environmental problems and suggests ways to control or contain their effects, by employing various treatment approaches, as well as recycling. The book consists of 15 chapters, with contributions made by many national and international professors, scientists, and researches from Egypt, Korea, and India. In the first chapter of this book, readers gain comprehensive knowledge on several methods of bioremediation in-situ and ex-situ of hazardous pollutants. Chapter 2 describes in detail the persistent organic pollutants POPs and other toxic chemicals associated with production, use and disposal of certain organic chemicals.

    American Chemical Society. Reference sources are a good starting point for any assignment topic, as they can help to clarify concepts and keywords, as well as provide an overview of a topic. They include dictionaries, encyclopedias, directories, handbooks, manuals, etc such as:. The titles below are just a small selection of the range of ebooks available for you to access. Search Quick Find for more titles. More videos can be found on the Images tab of this guide. Library Search this Group Search.

    Books and more Quick Find Search across almost all of the library's fulltext articles, ebooks, books and more. Quick Find search query Search. Smart Searching Smart: Suggested reference books.

    Reference sources Reference sources are a good starting point for any assignment topic, as they can help to clarify concepts and keywords, as well as provide an overview of a topic. They include dictionaries, encyclopedias, directories, handbooks, manuals, etc such as: A dictionary of environment and conservation The environment dictionary Handbook of environmental engineering assessment Handbook of environmental engineering calculations Handbook of environmental impact assessment Handbook of solid waste management Methods of environmental impact assessment.

    Heavy-metal contamination is one of the world's major environmental problems, posing significant risks to agro-ecosystems.

    Penn State University Libraries

    Conventional technologies employed for heavy-metal remediation have often been expensive and disruptive. Novel, environmentally friendly and inexpensive solutions are presented based on a sound understanding of metal contamination and the roles of plants and microbes in the management of these toxic soils.

    In comparison to conventional remediation approaches, modern methods are more superior and effective in removing a large amount of organic and inorganic pollutants from contaminated sources Ren and Umble, Most of environmental pollutants such as phenolics, non-phenolics, endocrine disrupting chemicals EDCs and heavy metals HMs are highly toxic in nature.

    Governments around the globe are strictly advocating for the mitigation of environmental pollution.

    Books and more - Environmental Pollution - Library guides at QUT

    This book is timely and focusses on the necessity to learn about the existing environmental problems and suggests ways to control or contain their effects, by employing various treatment approaches, as well as recycling. The book consists of 15 chapters, with contributions made by many national and international professors, scientists, and researches from Egypt, Korea, and India. In the first chapter of this book, readers gain comprehensive knowledge on several methods of bioremediation in-situ and ex-situ of hazardous pollutants.

    Chapter 2 describes in detail the persistent organic pollutants POPs and other toxic chemicals associated with production, use and disposal of certain organic chemicals. These chemicals are produced commercially for pest and disease control, crop production and industrial use. Chapter 3—7 of the book covers specific pollutants, from different sources which include pesticides, uranium radionuclide, dyes acidic and basic , and lindane contamination of the environment, respectively.

    These chapters not only describe the adverse effects of these pollutants on the environment, but also details the remedial measures needed for the problems caused by these pollutants. The presence of pollutants, including non-aqueous phase liquids NAPLs , can interact with the local environment in a variety of ways, both prior to and during the oxidant treatment.

    The Elements of Environmental Pollution

    These pollutants are easily mixed with water or organic solvents like oil, gasoline and petroleum products. Therefore, they affect not only terrestrial but also aquatic flora and fauna. How are boundaries drawn for the purposes of counting and comparing? And what is discounted, or never counted at all?

    On the legacy of Chernobyl and radiation history, I keep tabs on the historian Kate Brown, reading whatever she writes. These gaps, silences, incongruences, and uncertainties are an important piece of what it means to live in this moment.

    There is resilience and resolve and also radiation, and all of it makes up life there.

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    Radiation is one part of a bigger story, one mixed and muddled with other exposures, other experiences. But it is the lived experience that I want to focus on, which includes living the questions, the science, the debates over what to study and how to study it. All of this makes up the social experience of a disaster, and of contamination and pollution. To sociologists, the experience of exposure matters as much as the biological exposure. It is an experience that may include being studied—what does that feel like?

    Or of living with uncertainty; being confused by conflicting reports or duelling experts; of warnings, and overturned warnings; and perhaps most relevant here, to how a government responds to pollution, and by its administration of pollution—how a government goes about the business of remediation, relief, redress and compensation.

    These, too, have an effect and after-effects, too. It is the totality —and the diversity—of the lived experience that I want to highlight. It certainly widens what counts as harm. Alexievich is a journalist — a reporter — but she is also the recipient of a Nobel Prize for Literature.

    What does she achieve in Voices from Chernobyl? She crafted a series of intimate portraits based on hundreds of interviews. Each is in a different voice, and each one is striking, and singularly significant, with visceral imagery that will long stay with you. Reading becomes immersive: The way disasters unfold against a perfect sky. The messiness of cleanup, and the sacrifices made by those doing it. The accounts build into a polyphonic chorus. Diverse, discordant.

    I once read a review, I think it was in the New York Times, how her vignettes accumulate as radioactive particles do. The experiences of Chernobyl, and the state, medical and scientific responses to Chernobyl, building, building, until finally enveloping you. The Slow Poisoning of the Arctic.

    Think about the environmental issues facing the Arctic, and one thinks about warming, not the unseen accretion of pollution in its seemingly pristine environs and its dynamic food chain. Human activity moves it from place to place.

    Heavy metals like mercury and persistent organic pollutants, or POPs, as this class of pollutants is called, can also concentrate and move up the food chain.

    Silent Snow describes the invisible build-up of industrial pollution, in the circumpolar North. It explores the history and science of how we came to understand this, and to realise impossible-to-see and harder-to-sense pollution was concentrating far from factories and heavy industry.

    Marla Cone, a journalist, argues this may be the greatest environmental injustice on Earth. Cone makes the case for how this influx of pollution infringes on human rights and on the sovereignty of indigenous communities for whom the Arctic has been home for generations.

    It shows how a global environmental problem can be highly localised and uneven in its consequences. But importantly, Silent Snow is also a story of resilience, and of the leadership of indigenous communities to press these issues at the national and international level. The extraordinary efforts of, for example, The Inuit Circumpolar Council inspired the United Nations Stockholm Convention on POPs , which today identifies and moves out of production the most toxic, persistent and bioaccumualtive classes of pollutants.

    We all ought to know this story, since everyone of us, in one way or another and likely without realising it, has benefited from these protections. But who among us knows this history or its significance to our collective future? Plastic in the seas became a global story earlier this year, for example, when scientists reported that the beaches of Henderson, one of the remotest islands in the world, are filled with plastic. Henderson Island, which sits in the South Pacific, made headlines in May after researchers published estimates of how much plastic had collected there.

    What they found was mind-boggling — something like 38 million pieces on an island that measures 5 by 10 kilometres, is presently uninhabited by humans, a World Heritage site, meaning that it is protected, and thousands of miles from major land masses or urban areas. I was shocked to see how far away Henderson is from the areas of the Pacific Moore describe.

    Since the estimated total amount of plastics that have been made is around 9. This is equal the mass of a billion elephants — or enough to cover the whole of Argentina in ankle-deep.

    This is an underestimation, since synthetic plastics production was well underway before , accelerating and expanding in the years following WWII. He took up researching the issues himself, recruiting allies and scientists to the work.

    On multiple occasions, he returned to the Pacific to trawl for microplastics —for example, the small bits of pre- and post-production plastics that are less than 5 millimetres across.

    After quantifying the spread and load of marine plastics, Moore went on to help document their implications and their toxicity. Plastic Ocean , co-authored with Cassandra Phillips, documents these pursuits. When plastics are made, certain properties are designed into the material through the addition of chemical additives that impart colour, flexibility, resilience, fire resistance, and more. Plastics transfer these additives into the environment, and, in turn, they can collect and transport other classes of marine pollution, including the PCBs and other POPs we discussed earlier.

    As Moore describes it, this leads to the ultimate paradox of our modern situation. Researchers now collect pollution to study pollution—they harvest marine plastics as a way to study levels of legacy POPs. His accidental encounter with marine plastics forced Moore to reckon with questions of inheritance and legacy. As he explains in Plastic Ocean , his father was an industrial chemist and his grandfather, an oil executive.

    To my mind, Plastic Ocean represents a new genre of books about pollution, health and the environment written by the second and third generations of the Plastics and Chemical Age — or, put differently, by the children and grandchildren of those employed by major 20th-century industries.

    These works have been my companions as I learn how to write in a way that spans memoir and environmental sociology. For a time in the s and early s my father made Bakelite, the first fully-synthetic i.

    So for me, plastics —and particularly marine plastics — are where the personal and the sociological collide. I spent my graduate school years studying the science, history, legacy and distribution of POPs, and the years since, studying plastics.

    Pollution in various forms looks to be very hard to escape. What are some of the ways to change this? And so one of the themes that I hope shines through is the significance of the act of witnessing.

    I was recently corresponding with Max Liboiron, the scholar I mentioned earlier, whose remarkable civic plastics laboratory I visited last spring. Over email, we discussed how many of the general audience books about plastics and also chemical burdens explore the global nature of these problems and then pair that with a chapter on things individuals can do in response.

    This creates a major and problematic mismatch in scales. But individuals can have far more influence, for example, as citizens, or as these books show, as witnesses and artists. Alternatively, one can move up one level of influence to affect change in the downloading and consumption practices in their communities, workplaces, schools and places of worship.